“: A shot of the waterspout over the Dog River bridge. ”

Water Spout Fragment in the Shape of a Dog
Photo provided by Flickr
Right next to the standard waist-high fountain for humans is a fountain for dogs. It’s low, accessible and easy to use. The bowl easily fills up for dogs who prefer to lap water up from a pool, and the spout is easy to use for dogs who prefer to drink from flowing water. Almost every time I go there, a fellow dog guardian is gushing about how wonderful it is to have a drinking fountain for dogs. I agree, and wish even more of our public parks had them.
Water Spout Fragment in the Shape of a Dog
Photo provided by Flickr
The 12,000 square foot fenced dog park is the only one of its kind in Over-the-Rhine and the downtown area. It offers unique features for visitors and their pets, such as a water creek for the dogs to play in, large granite boulders, and a water fountain with fresh water for the pet owners and a spout close to the ground for dogs. Benches will line the perimeter so visitors can read a book, socialize with other patrons or just relax. It also features a special synthetic canine turf and pea gravel to maintain cleanliness. The park will be maintained by the Park Board, keeping it a desirable place for everyone. Watch This Genius Dog Use the Water Spout to Cool Down - Esquire
Photo provided by FlickrWater Spout Fragment in the Shape of a Dog (Getty Museum)
Photo provided by Flickrfountain with fresh water for the pet owners and a spout close to the ground for dogs.
Photo provided by Flickr
For large breed dogs and older dogs with joint and muscle problems, the re-circulating water comes from a spout that can be rotating 360°, for your dog's convenience. This size holds 355 ounces! The purifying filter is similar to that shown above for the Catit Drinking Fountain. Our waterpark features a splash pad with ten different water features including a misting fire hydrant, vertical and jumping water sprays, a water volcano, and a large dog-shaped water spout that shoots water in six different directions.Our waterpark features a splash pad with ten different water features including a misting fire hydrant, vertical and jumping water sprays, a water volcano, and a large dog-shaped water spout that shoots water in six different directions.The waterspouts were mostly produced in moulds, and then re-touched while the clay was still damp, particularly for hair on the dogs and on the manes of felines. Generations of moulds were created through the production of new moulds from actual examples, and many different types may have been produced from a single prototype that has been re-worked. Some apparent spouts are not actually functional, particularly the canine protomes, which often are not pierced to allow water to escape through the channel designed between the forepaws.The waterspouts include 189 examples of lion heads, 2 of panthers, 292 protomes of dogs, one boar's head, 44 Silen heads/theatrical masks and one human head. The majority range in date from the first century B.C. to the first A.D., primarily in the Augustan and Julio-Claudian periods, and come mostly from Rome and Latium. Dog protomes in Italy were used almost exclusively on private buildings, as witnessed primarily in Pompei. Sacred contexts are not altogether unknown, such as in the Sanctuary of the Great Mother on the Palatine, where they may have decorated colonnades during the Augustan phase. The period of maximum usage is, in fact, during the Augustan period, and the areas in which they are most frequently encountered are Latium and Campania. Unlike the feline waterspouts that depict only the head of the beast, with water expelled through the open mouth, the canine spouts include the entire forequarters, with an opening between the paws for draining the rainwater from the roof.