Dogs for Adoption: Adopt a Dog or Puppy in OKC | OK Humane Society

Dogs and puppies currently available for adoption at the Nebraska Humane Society
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For more information, email , visit our and facebook pages, or stop by the shelter and find your next best friend!
As part of a generous grant from the , LifeLine Animal Project is challenging Atlanta residents to join us and say "I'm IN" by adopting 20,000 dogs and cats over the next three years! Are you in?
Dogs and Puppies Available for Adoption from the Michigan Humane Society
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Posey (named after Buster Posey) is not a Giant, but he lives to play ball and he definitely is the MVP (most valuable pooch)! He's a one and a half year-old, 12 pound miniature Poodle that was found as a stray in South County. He's very smart and active and enjoys long walks. He's house trained and crate trained, gets along well with other dogs after a proper introduction, initially he is a little reactive on leash when he sees other dogs. He loves being around his humans and has a little bit of separation anxiety - he's not the type that wants to be left alone in the yard. Posey is an athletic dog and is a good prospect for agility or trick training. He can easily clear a 4 foot fence, so a secure back yard is a must. Interested in meeting or adopting Posey? The first step is to , making sure to answer all the questions. Here, you can find out more information about adopting Guiding Eyes for the Blind puppies and dogs.
Photo provided by FlickrThe dogs below are new arrivals. All recent intakes are in medical quarantine for two weeks and should be available for adoption soon.
Photo provided by FlickrRocket Dog Rescue’s mobile adoptions are your chance to come meet Rocket Dogs currently for adoption. We’re out and …
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All pets at the Kentucky Humane Society are spayed or neutered and micro-chipped and are up-to-date on vaccinations. If you are thinking about adding a pet to your family, please make adoption your first option. If we don't have the perfect pet for you now, keep checking our website. We take in hundreds of homeless pets a month and have a wide selection of adoptable cats and dogs. 1. Making the Best of the First Week with Your Dog - Just like us, dogs need order and leadership, especially dogs for adoption that aren’t accustom to a daily routine. They seek structure, which you must provide. Your dog needs to know that you are the boss and that you have a set of house rules. This makes the transition from the shelter to your home easier, faster and more rewarding. Hold a family meeting to create rules about caring for the dog. Purchase your basic dog care items such as ID tags, a collar and a 6 foot leash, food and water bowls, food, dog toys, a crate and bedding, and basic grooming tools. Just before you bring your dog into the home, take him for a walk to tire him out a little. At first, limit your dog to one room or area. Most dogs instinctively like to den, and a crate makes the ideal place for your dog to sleep and get away from household hubbub, a crate is where a lot of dogs for adoption already have spent a lot of time so it will feel familiar. Plan a trip to the vet in order to make sure your dog is healthy and will not transmit any diseases to other local dogs. For more tips, and advice read the full post at our blog. All pets at the Kentucky Humane Society are spayed or neutered and micro-chipped and are up-to-date on vaccinations. If you are thinking about adding a pet to your family, please make adoption your first option. If we don't have the perfect pet for you now, keep checking our website. We take in hundreds of homeless pets a month and have a wide selection of adoptable cats and dogs. 2. Introducing A Puppy to an Adult Dog – First make sure your dog(s) are current on all their vaccinations, including bordatella (kennel cough) especially if the puppy is coming from a shelter or rescue kennel, or has been exposed to other dogs for adoption. Just having the new puppy in the house is enough for your older dog to get used to, start out by keeping the puppy in isolated from the older dog. As for the first introduction pick a neutral and unfamiliar territory, such as a street or park you don’t usually visit. For a really young puppy (4 months and under): start by having a friend (not a family member) holding the puppy in their arms and letting your friendly adult dog take a good sniff. For future meetings going on walks together is a wonderful bonding activity! For more tips follow along at our blog.