Alpine Flannel Dog Coat - Hunter Green and Navy Blue Plaid

ABO Gear Aussie Naturals Quilted Cotton Dog Coat, Hunter Green, Medium (16-18
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But–and for hunters this is a most important but–no law, rule or directive requires a hunter to keep his poodle in those outlandish dog show trims that make the dog look like a sissified male lion. Au contraire, the hunter may, can and should keep his poodle’s coat trimmed down to somewhere around one inch long all over. At that length it curls tightly up against the skin.
Hunter Green Herringbone Flannel Dog Coat
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I purchased the nylon turnout for my papillon years ago when they were featured by Orvis. This is not a lap dog, she is a farm dog/hunter who spends hours wandering around outside. The quality is super. Eight years of hard wear and it is still going strong. I have been waiting for it to wear out so I can justify purchasing another one in a fancy color, Orvis only had 3 colors when I bought this one. Doesn't look like a new coat is in my dogs immediate future, but when I do need another one, It will be a Foggy Mountain. Barbour Linton jacket Hunter dark olive wellingtons with cream welly socks Barbour wax dog coat
Photo provided by FlickrABO Gear Hunter Green Wool Dog Coat
Photo provided by FlickrABO Gear Hunter Green Wool Dog Coat
Photo provided by Flickr
Biddable, versatile, easy to train, and excellent retrievers, shorthairs naturally work in range of hunters on foot. Their coats pick up no burrs, yet somehow keep the dogs warm on cold late-season hunts. Shorthairs carry a dignified and intelligent expression some interpret as aloof. While kenneled GSPs can be standoffish, if you raise a shorthair in the house you will have a friend for life.These were the facts: The breed had started in South Carolina in the early 1900s, first used by turkey hunters plying the swamps in small homemade boats. But soon the breed’s penchant for flushing and retrieving became apparent, and Boykins found themselves in duck blinds and, later, quail fields. These days they also make a great dog for the dove field. (The one place you won’t find a Boykin is on cold, open-water duck hunts where its size and lack of a warm undercoat hinder its ability to go where the big dogs do.)In the 1880s, German hunters mixed griffons, foxhounds, poodles, and shorthairs to produce a breed that could point upland birds, retrieve waterfowl, kill vermin, and track stags—wrapped in a bristly coat that insulates without attracting burrs. Wirehairs exist in two separate breeds: the Deutsch drahthaar and the Americanized German wirehaired pointer. Drahthaars are bred and tested for the versatility that originally defined the breed. Some are prickly with people and not ideal dogs around children. All drahthaars are death on small mammals, including cats, and they are also relentless trackers and retrievers.Plotts are one of America’s great big-game breeds. Their lineage can be traced back to Johannes George Plott, who emigrated from Germany to the Smoky Mountains of North Carolina with a mix of German bloodhounds in the 1750s. The Plott family bred their dogs for decades, and eventually Plott hounds became famous for hunting bears and boars, and later on for running coons. Plotts come in a variety of colors, but all have a brindled, glossy coat. Today’s Plotts are athletic, medium-framed hounds best known for being able to sort out complicated scent trails over challenging terrain.They’re cute, no question. In calendars and sappy greeting cards, Labrador retriever puppies cavort and cuddle, but those aren’t the Labs a hunter loves. For a hunter, cute is a Lab with a bird in his mouth, coat spackled with duckweed, paws slimed with mud. What melts a hunter’s heart is a Lab 100 yards beyond the farthest decoy, diving for a cripple, never giving up. I’ve had wet Labs curled up in the backseat, stinking of swamp, too tired to walk—but let that pooch hear the jangle of a duck-call lanyard and there he is, at your side and ready to go. That, sir, is a dog. Hit the streets and the slopes in style with the Alpine Flannel Dog Coat in Hunter Green and Navy Blue Plaid!Why We Love It:Winter won't stand a chance against this warm designer Flannel Dog Coat by Doggie Design. This practical design doesn't skimp on fashion with a classy hunter green and navy blue plaid flannel on the exterior with a thick black faux fur inner lining. This cozy coat is easy to apply and works with even hard-to-fit breeds. Simply slip the coat over your pup's head and wrap the chest panel between your dog's front legs. Next, snap bring the belt up and around your dog's back and clip. Make any necessary adjustments to the toggle neck cinch and belt for a perfect fit that locks out the cold weather. Reflective trim helps keep you and your dog visible in low-light conditions. A covered leash access hole makes walks safe and warm.The chest coverage of this winter dog jacket is substantial and can be adjusted to fit most breeds and provides cold-weather protection that most dog coats can't match. The high-cut tummy keeps your pet clean and dry. Garment Information and Care:Made of 40% cotton 60% polyester, Hand wash, and line dry.Check out the other colors and patterns for the Alpine Dog Coat (each sold separately) for a warm and fashionable season for the whole pack!