Does My Dog Have MRSA? Is it contagious? — Canine Skin Solutions

is slow in healing; MRSA can also infect the dog's urinary tract, ears, eyes and joints.
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Because of a large number of categories, we recategorized several variables. Breed was categorized according to size based on weight: small (1–10 kg), medium (>10–25 kg), or large (>25 kg). Age was categorized as young (2 years), middle aged (>2–8 years), or old (>8 years). Site (where MRSA or MSSA was cultured) was categorized as skin, ear, urinary, skeletal, and other (abdominal fluid, thoracic fluid, blood, oral cavity, lymph node, vagina, transtracheal wash fluid, and milk). The number of days dogs were hospitalized was categorized as short (2 days), medium (3–7 days), or long (>7 days). Finally, specific antimicrobial drugs were grouped according to classes, i.e., aminoglycoside, β-lactam, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolone, lincosamide, nitroimidazole, and tetracycline. For analytical purposes, dogs were subcategorized into 4 groups: did not receive any antimicrobial drug in the previous 90 days, received that specific class of antimicrobial drug, received another class of antimicrobial drug, and unknown status.
Among 40 dogs with MRSA and 80 with MSSA infections, highest prevalence of both in- fections was found in skin and ears
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So we cultured it and sent it off to the state vet school to do an antibiotic resistance test on it. It came back as the canine equivalent of MRSA (different acronym in dogs, but the human one will convey what I'm talking about) -- dogs can get antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their ears. It's a bad deal when they do because it's very hard to treat. The lab then did a series of tests to find out if antibiotic worked -- and there was only one that did (a weird one not usually used in ears). Jan 1, 2010 - Among 40 dogs with MRSA and 80 with MSSA infections, highest prevalence of both infections was found in skin and ears
Photo provided by FlickrAmong 40 dogs with MRSA and 80 with MSSA infections, highest prevalence of both infections was found in skin and ears
Photo provided by FlickrJan 11, 2010 - Among 40 dogs with MRSA and 80 with MSSA infections, highest prevalence of both infections was found in skin and ears
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MRSA infections are not as common in dogs and cats. While MRSA is a major issue in human health, are more likely to be affected by a different bacterial strain called methicillin-resistant staphylococcus pseudointermedius or MRSP. These infections usually infect canines through skin wounds, surgical sites and ears — and like MRSA, they are difficult to treat.
Antibiotic-resistant infection or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most common causes of antibiotic resistance in dogs. MRSA infection can be life threatening because it is hard to get rid of as it resists the antibiotics that veterinarians usually prescribe such as penicillin and amoxicillin. Your dog can be infected through a skin abrasion, cut, incision from surgery, or from your dog’s ears or nose. This is most often seen in animals that have been treated with antibiotic therapy or those in crowded situations, such as a breeder. MRSA is extremely contagious and can be passed from people to dogs and vice versa.Antibiotic-resistant infection or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most common causes of antibiotic resistance in dogs. MRSA infection can be life threatening because it is hard to get rid of as it resists the antibiotics that veterinarians usually prescribe such as penicillin and amoxicillin. Your dog can be infected through a skin abrasion, cut, incision from surgery, or from your dog’s ears or nose. This is most often seen in animals that have been treated with antibiotic therapy or those in crowded situations, such as a breeder. MRSA is extremely contagious and can be passed from people to dogs and vice versa. Breed distribution was categorized according to weight (). Ages of MRSA case-patients ranged from 1 to 13 years (mean 5.6 and median 5.0 years). Ages of MSSA control dogs ranged from 6 months to 16 years (mean 6.8 and median 7.0 years). No distinction was made between intact or sterilized dogs. Overall, no significant differences appeared between case-patients and controls with respect to breed (p = 0.18), age (p = 0.50), or sex (p = 0.29).