Video: Removing Mats in Dog Hair | Martha Stewart

Instead of going to the dog groomer, save some money and learn to remove matted hair yourself
Photo provided by Flickr
ou're peacefully brushing your dog's coat when your comb suddenly hits an obstruction. You've found a mat --a solid clump of fur that forms when the hair tangles and collects shed hair, dirt and debris. Mats can occur anywhere in the coat, but you are most likely to find them behind your dog's ears, near the armpits or on the hindquarters. Unfortunately, brushing and combing alone aren't enough to untangle a mat, but it must be removed. You'll need some patience, time, and perhaps a little help.
Remove matted dog hair
Photo provided by Flickr
If the dog’s mats cannot be removed in any of the ways above, the dog may need to be shaved down using a clipper. If you will be clipping the hair, you will want to start with a #5 blade and work up to a number 10 blade if the other blades will not move through the mats. A number 10 blade will shave the dog practically down to the skin, so be prepared.

Once the hair is very short, daily brushing will help keep the hair mats under control.
Check for matted hair under the legs and remove. These will limit the dog from running and walking without rubbing his skin sore and raw.
Photo provided by FlickrMatted Hair on your Long Haired Dog Breed: Here are ten tips to remove them easily.
Photo provided by FlickrPet expert Marc Morrone shares an effective method for removing mats from dog hair.
Photo provided by Flickr

Yes! Matted hair on pets is a problem - just ask this Shih Tzu above who was unable to see because of mats of hair on his face!

Matting is common on non-shedding breeds of dogs. Matting ranges from harmless to dangerous. A few small mats are common, especially around a dog's ears or collar, and in between the legs. But when matting gets close to the skin, or there are many mats, it can become a problem.

Heavy matting can be even more of a problem. Matted hair can hold tears, feces and urine next to the skin. This can cause irritation, pain, and potential skin infection. If left for a long time this can cause hyperpigmentation (darkening of the skin) and/or hyperkeratosis (elephant skin). Heavily matted hair can change a dog's movement, cut off circulation, or hide infected wounds. In an extreme case, matting can tighten around a dog's leg or tail, slowly constricting until it has cut through to the bone!

In addition to health problems, matting can have a serious effect on your budget! When matting gets close to the skin, or there are many mats, it adds to the time our Groomer spends with your dog - causing delays and cancellations. Manual dematting or a close shave are both uncomfortable for your dog. His protests might require our Veterinary Assistant or Technician to stop her work to assist! This matting can add time - and cost - to your dog's regular grooming.

Shaving the hair off the dog is a temporary solution - and a poor one. For a close shave, if a clipper cannot slide between your dog's skin and the matting, dematting is necessary to begin removing hair. In this scenario, it is rarely possible for your dog to come home with a cute, even shave. Close shaves - with or without mats - have their own risk. Close shaves require changing and cooling blades of the clipper to protect dogs from heat burns. Friction burns (like a rope burn) are unfortunately possible because the moving parts of the clipper are so close to the dog's skin. If a dog with a plush coat is to have a lamb, or fluffy, cut, the coat must be completely free of all mats and tangles. Even while working quickly with a cooperative dog, dematting expense, in 15-minute increments, can add up fast!

It might not save time to wait so long in between grooming appointments. Grooming cost can be minimized by taking care of your dog's coat at home.Although the long, silky, hair of a long-haired dog is beautiful, it can also be difficult to keep tangle free. Despite your best efforts, every dog will likely develop a mat from time to time. Sometimes the mats are small and a simple brushing will remove them. Other times the mats are very large or there are many of them and can be stubborn. No matter what the size or quantity of the mats, there are ways you can easily remove the mats from your dog's coat.7 Home Remedies to Groom Your Dog # 5. Use Olive Oil on Matted Hair Loosen your dog's matted hair by rubbing a little olive oil into the knot. Then gently comb through the matted area with a wire brush until the brush teeth glide smoothly through the dogs coat7 Home Remedies to Groom Your Dog # 5. Use Olive Oil on Matted Hair Loosen your dog's matted hair by rubbing a little olive oil into the knot. Then gently comb through the matted area with a wire brush until the brush teeth glide smoothly through the dogs coat