or cats that include ingredients such as chamomile and tryptophan

Nov 1, 2013 - Pets like familiar people and routines, and the holiday season poses some challenges
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Tryptophan and abnormal-repetitive behaviors: This was another double-blind and placebo-controlled study (3). In addition, the researchers used a “cross-over” design in which half of the dogs are first fed the control and the other half are first fed the test diet for a period of time and are then all switched to the alternate diet for a second study period. This is a well-accepted study design that is helpful when a researcher has limited number of subjects and that helps to control for the placebo effect. A group of 29 dogs was identified, each presenting with a form of abnormal-repetitive behavior. These were: circling, anxiety-related lick granuloma, light chasing/shadow staring, or stool eating. (Note: One might question the inclusion of stool-eating in this study, since many pet professionals consider eating feces to be a form of scavenging behavior that is normal and common in the domestic dog). Dogs were treated for 2-week periods and the frequencies of their abnormal behaviors were recorded daily. Results: The researchers reported no effect of supplemental L-tryptophan on the frequency or intensity of abnormal-repetitive behaviors. Although the owners reported slight improvements over time, this occurred both when dogs were receiving the supplemental tryptophan and while they were eating the control diet (there is the insidious placebo effect again). Limitations of this study were that it was very short-term and it targeted uncommon behavior problems that are notoriously resistant to treatment. Still, this study did not provide any evidence to support a use of tryptophan supplementation for repetitive behavior problems in dogs. (So, to all you folks who live with poop-eaters – sorry, no easy answer here with L-tryptophan).
Oct 2, 2014 - Today, a range of L-tryptophan supplements are marketed for reducing anxiety and inducing calmness in dogs
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Tryptophan and abnormal-repetitive behaviors: This was another double-blind and placebo-controlled study (3). In addition, the researchers used a “cross-over” design in which half of the dogs are first fed the control and the other half are first fed the test diet for a period of time and are then all switched to the alternate diet for a second study period. This is a well-accepted study design that is helpful when a researcher has limited number of subjects and that helps to control for the placebo effect. A group of 29 dogs was identified, each presenting with a form of abnormal-repetitive behavior. These were: circling, anxiety-related lick granuloma, light chasing/shadow staring, or stool eating. (Note: One might question the inclusion of stool-eating in this study, since many pet professionals consider eating feces to be a form of scavenging behavior that is normal and common in the domestic dog). Dogs were treated for 2-week periods and the frequencies of their abnormal behaviors were recorded daily. Results: The researchers reported no effect of supplemental L-tryptophan on the frequency or intensity of abnormal-repetitive behaviors. Although the owners reported slight improvements over time, this occurred both when dogs were receiving the supplemental tryptophan and while they were eating the control diet (there is the insidious placebo effect again). Limitations of this study were that it was very short-term and it targeted uncommon behavior problems that are notoriously resistant to treatment. Still, this study did not provide any evidence to support a use of tryptophan supplementation for repetitive behavior problems in dogs. (So, to all you folks who live with poop-eaters – sorry, no easy answer here with L-tryptophan). Oct 24, 2014 - Today, a range of L-tryptophan supplements are marketed for reducing anxiety and inducing calmness in dogs
Photo provided by FlickrTryptophan - Mercola Healthy Pets - Dr. Mercola
Photo provided by FlickrJan 12, 2012 - Find out how to get rid of your dog's problem behavior simply by modifying his diet.
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Everyday it seems like I learn something new from pet owners. I was looking at some of the search terms people have been using to find my website and I discovered that quite a few people found my post about by searching for the term tryptophan supplements for dogs. Since I had never heard about giving tryptophan to dogs I decided to research the topic to learn more about it. It seems like with anything else, the only way to know if your dog will respond to a tryptophan supplement is to try it out for yourself. Also, if you haven’t already, I would recommend feeding your dog a low-protein diet first before supplementing with tryptophan. In , the lowest protein levels fed to dogs was 17%.